53. Case Report: CTEPH & May Thurner Syndrome – Temple University

CardioNerds (Amit Goyal & Daniel Ambinder) join Temple Cardiology Fellows (Anika Vaidy and Anne- Sophie LaCharite-Roberge) in Philadelphia, PA! They discuss a fascinating case of pulmonary hypertension secondary to Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) associated with May Thurner syndrome and large uterine fibroids. Dr. Vaidya provides the E-CPR and message to applicants. Episode notes were developed by Johns Hopkins internal medicine resident, Eunice Dugan, with mentorship from University of Maryland cardiology fellow Karan Desai. 

Jump to: Patient summaryCase figures & mediaCase teachingEducational videoReferencesProduction team

CardioNerds (Amit Goyal & Daniel Ambinder) join Temple Cardiology Fellows (Anika Vaidy and Anne- Sophie LaCharite-Roberge) in Philadelphia, PA! They discuss a fascinating case of pulmonary hypertension secondary to Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) associated with May Thurner syndrome and large uterine fibroids. Dr. Vaidya provides the E-CPR and message to applicants. Episode notes were developed by Johns Hopkins internal medicine resident, Eunice Dugan, with mentorship from University of Maryland cardiology fellow Karan Desai.
Episode graphic by Dr. Carine Hamo

The CardioNerds Cardiology Case Reports series shines light on the hidden curriculum of medical storytelling. We learn together while discussing fascinating cases in this fun, engaging, and educational format. Each episode ends with an “Expert CardioNerd Perspectives & Review” (E-CPR) for a nuanced teaching from a content expert. We truly believe that hearing about a patient is the singular theme that unifies everyone at every level, from the student to the professor emeritus.

We are teaming up with the ACC FIT Section to use the #CNCR episodes to showcase CV education across the country in the era of virtual recruitment. As part of the recruitment series, each episode features fellows from a given program discussing and teaching about an interesting case as well as sharing what makes their hearts flutter about their fellowship training. The case discussion is followed by both an E-CPR segment and a message from the program director.

CardioNerds Case Reports Page
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Cardionerds Cardiology Podcast Presents CardioNerds Case Report Series

Patient Summary

A woman in her late 40s with history of iron deficiency anemia, uterine fibroids, and recurrent DVTs/PEs for the past 6 years despite different anticoagulation regimens, presented with syncope and progressive dyspnea on exertion. Family history was negative for DVT/PE or hypercoagulable states. On exam, she was euvolemic. Labs were significant for anemia, a normal pro-BNP, and a negative extensive hypercoagulable workup. TTE showed interventricular systolic septal flattening, right ventricular outflow tract pulse wave doppler with mid-systolic notch, and shortened acceleration time consistent with elevated pulmonary artery pressure. A VQ scan showed bilateral right greater than left mis-matched perfusion defects. CT angiogram showed right greater than left chronic mural thrombus, correlating with pulmonary angiogram which showed severe proximal and mid-vessel disease on the right and distal disease on the left. RHC corroborated the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) with mean pulmonary artery pressure of 41 and PVR of 5.2 Woods Units (WU).  

To determine the etiology of her recurrent clots, a lower extremity venogram was performed and showed 80% stenosis of her left common iliac vein by the overlying right common iliac artery confirming May-Thurner syndrome. Lower extremity venogram also showed severe proximal stenosis of right iliac vein thought to be due to large uterine fibroids. Given her severe proximal and mid-vessel clot burden, she underwent pulmonary thromboendarterectomy with a subsequent drop in pulmonary vascular resistance to 1 WU.  The etiology of DVTs and CTEPH was determined to be external compression related to both May-Thurner syndrome and uterine fibroids. To prevent future thromboembolic events, she underwent stenting of her left common iliac vein and hysterectomy. With these interventions, RV function returned to normal, and her symptoms completely resolved! 


Case Media

Figue Legend:
A. CXR
B. ECG
C. TTE: Interventricular systolic septal flattening, RVOT pulse wave Doppler with mid-systolic notch and shortened acceleration time, consistent with elevated PVR, RV:LV ratio 1.3, consistent with moderate RV enlargement, The RV is apex-sharing with an open apical angle
D. VQ Scan: Multiple b/l perfusion defects, R > L, V scan normal
E. CT Angiogram: 1) Enlarged R main PA2) large proximal chronic mural thrombus with minimal vessel count throughout R side, 3) Segmental LLL lining thrombus
F. Pulmonary angiogram significant for severe proximal and mid-vessel disease in the right segmental arteries. Patient also had severe distal disease in the left sub segmental disease (not shown).
G. Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy (PTE)
H. LE Venogram: LEFT CIV  > 80% stenosis as a result of compression from an overlying right common iliac artery. This is consistent with May-Thurner syndrome. RIGHT EIV (not shown)– Significant proximal stenosis
I. Status Post left iliac vein stent
J. ECG: New typical atrial flutter


Episode Schematics & Teaching


The CardioNerds 5! – 5 major takeaways from the #CNCR case

  1. In patients with progressive dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and persistence of symptoms of PE despite adequate anticoagulation, there should be an evaluation for Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH).  CTEPH is a form of pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) from incomplete resolution of pulmonary thromboemboli causing chronic, fibrotic, flow limiting changes to the pulmonary vascular bed. Risk factors include recurrent PE, hypercoagulable states, and medical conditions such as splenectomy, ventriculo-atrial shunts, infected intravenous catheters/devices, malignancy, and external venous compression. NOTE: many patients will not have a documented history of DVT/PE and so a high index of suspicion is important. 
  2. The following echocardiographic findings suggest pulmonary hypertension: interventricular systolic septal flattening indicating RV pressure overload, RV outflow tract (RVOT) pulse wave doppler with mid-systolic notch, decreased RVOT acceleration time, right atrial enlargement, right ventricular dilation and hypertrophy +/- functional tricuspid regurgitation, and an elevated estimated RV systolic pressure (RVSP). 
  3. CTEPH is rare and carries a high rate of morbidity and mortality; therefore, a high index of suspicion is necessary. There are two components to diagnosis:  
    • Diagnose CTEPH: Multiple imaging modalities are involved to confirm and assess severity. V/Q scan is highly sensitive and is the initial screening modality to detect perfusion abnormalities. Chest CT with IV contrast may identify parenchymal and mediastinal pathology not otherwise seen; although not sensitive, CT may show: PA dilation, eccentric filling defects with variable degrees of occlusion, vascular webs or bands, mosaic perfusion pattern of the lung parenchyma, and RV enlargement. RHC can confirm the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, differentiate pre-capillary from post-capillary PH, quantify vascular resistance and cardiac output, and can be a comparative marker post-intervention. Conventional PA angiography is useful for pre-operative planning. 
    • Diagnose the underlying predisposition/etiology: Think about Virchow’s Triad: Hypercoagulability, Stasis, and Endothelial injury. Apart from ruling out hypercoagulable states, evaluating for lower extremity vascular compression can be important in select patients with imaging such as venography. May-Thurner syndrome is a condition of extrinsic venous compression of the left common iliac vein by the common iliac artery. Evidence of any compression should be addressed to prevent future venous thrombi and subsequent emboli.  
  4. Treatment for CTEPH starts with lifelong anticoagulation. Pulmonary angiography aids in surgical planning as proximal disease is more likely to be operable than distal disease. Based on severity and other comorbidities, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be a favorable option. PEA improves symptoms, survival, hemodynamics parameters, and RV remodeling. Other treatment strategies include medical management, balloon pulmonary angioplasty, and lung transplant. Pulmonary artery denervation is being considered as an experimental modality.  
  5. Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is common in patients with pulmonary artery hypertension and CTEPH and often indicate progression of right-sided dysfunction. PH patients rely more on active than passive RV filling, and are highly sensitive to changes in RV afterload. Supraventricular tachycardias may further precipitate decompensation given (1) the loss of atrial kick which compromises diastolic filling, and (2) tachycardias which increase RV wall tension increasing RV afterload. Therefore, restoration of sinus rhythm is strongly encouraged. 

Educational Video

Produced by Dr. Karan Desai


References


CardioNerds Case Reports: Recruitment Edition Series Production Team

50. Case Report: Hereditary Restrictive Cardiomyopathy – Duke University

CardioNerds (Amit Goyal & Dan Ambinder) discuss a case of hereditary restrictive cardiomyopathy with Duke University cardiology fellows Navid Nafissi and Sipa Yankey, and Marat Fudim, an advanced heart failure attending. E-CPR is provided by Dr. Richa Agarwal, fellowship program director of advanced heart failure and cardiac transplantation at Duke University with a final message by fellowship director Dr. Anna Lisa Crowley. Episode notes were developed by Johns Hopkins internal medicine resident Colin Blumenthal with mentorship from University of Maryland cardiology fellow Karan Desai.  

Jump to: Patient summaryCase figures & mediaCase teachingEducational videoReferencesProduction team

CardioNerds (Amit Goyal & Dan Ambinder) discuss a case of hereditary restrictive cardiomyopathy with Duke University cardiology fellows Navid Nafissi and Sipa Yankey, and Marat Fudim, an advanced heart failure attending at Duke University. E-CPR is  provided by Dr. Richa Agarwal, fellowship program director of advanced heart failure and cardiac transplantation at Duke University with a final message by fellowship director Dr. Anna Lisa Crowley. Episode notes were developed by Johns Hopkins internal medicine resident Colin Blumenthal with mentorship from University of Maryland cardiology fellow Karan Desai.
Episode graphic by Dr. Carine Hamo

The CardioNerds Cardiology Case Reports series shines light on the hidden curriculum of medical storytelling. We learn together while discussing fascinating cases in this fun, engaging, and educational format. Each episode ends with an “Expert CardioNerd Perspectives & Review” (E-CPR) for a nuanced teaching from a content expert. We truly believe that hearing about a patient is the singular theme that unifies everyone at every level, from the student to the professor emeritus.

We are teaming up with the ACC FIT Section to use the #CNCR episodes to showcase CV education across the country in the era of virtual recruitment. As part of the recruitment series, each episode features fellows from a given program discussing and teaching about an interesting case as well as sharing what makes their hearts flutter about their fellowship training. The case discussion is followed by both an E-CPR segment and a message from the program director.

CardioNerds Case Reports Page
CardioNerds Episode Page
CardioNerds Academy
Subscribe to our newsletter- The Heartbeat
Support our educational mission by becoming a Patron!
Cardiology Programs Twitter Group created by Dr. Nosheen Reza

Cardionerds Cardiology Podcast Presents CardioNerds Case Report Series

Patient Summary

A 69 yo M with history of atrial fibrillation presents with 5 months of progressive HF symptoms, now NYHA class IV. He was found to be grossly volume overloaded, tachycardic in atrial fibrillation, and hypoxic. CXR demonstrated significant cardiomegaly, and labs indicated new normocytic anemia with evidence of hepatic dysfunction and an elevated NT proBNP. TTE demonstrated massive bi-atrial enlargement, preserved ejection fraction, filling pattern consistent with grade III diastolic dysfunction, and torrential TR. The echocardiogram did not have evidence of constrictive pericarditis and agitated saline study showed Right to Left shunt through a likely PFO. MRI to evaluate for infiltrative cardiomyopathy did not show late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). RHC demonstrated findings consistent with restrictive cardiomyopathy including equalization of diastolic pressures, square root sign, and concordance of RV and LV pressures. PYP scan evaluating for TTR amyloid was negative and laboratory workup did not suggest AL amyloid, Fabry’s, Hemochromatosis, or storage disease. Patient’s symptoms remained refractory and thus eventually underwent successful OHT. Genetic testing eventually revealed missense mutation in MYBPC3 – revealing an inherited cause of restrictive CM for the patient! 


Case Media


Episode Schematics & Teaching


The CardioNerds 5! – 5 major takeaways from the #CNCR case

  1. When thinking about the etiology of a restrictive cardiomyopathy, we can organize the causes into four major categories: 
    1. Infiltrative (e.g., amyloidosis, sarcoidosis) 
    2. Storage diseases (e.g., hemochromatosis, Fabry’s) 
    3. Non-infiltrative (e.g., idiopathic, diabetic cardiomyopathy, genetic causes) 
    4. Endomyocardial (e.g., endomyocardial fibrosis, hypereosinophilic syndrome) 
  2. On examination, patients with restrictive cardiomyopathy may have prominent right-sided symptoms, including hepatomegaly, ascites, and significant peripheral edema. On exam, neck veins may demonstrate a steep y descent, and cardiac auscultation may have a +S4, and murmurs of tricuspid and mitral regurgitation.
  3. A multimodal imaging workup is recommended for evaluating RCM.  
    1. TTE: Typically demonstrates normal LVEF, normal chamber volumes, biatrial enlargement, and restrictive diastolic filling patterns (.e.g, E/A > 2, E/e’ > 14, decreased mitral deceleration time < 150 ms). We can see increased wall thickness with infiltrative processes and storage diseases.
    2. cMRI: specific patterns of Late Gadolinium Enhancement may indicate certain pathology (e.g., amyloid may demonstrate diffuse subendocardial, heterogeneous, or transmural signal). T2 signal can identify inflammation and quantify iron. 
    3. PYP scan: It has a >99% sensitivity for cardiac ATTR amyloid. If monoclonal gammopathy excluded, PPV 100%. 
  4. Invasive hemodynamics can show physiology consistent with RCM. This includes square root sign, equalization of diastolic pressures, and concordance during respiration of LV/RV pressure changes. In contrast, constrictive physiology will yield discordant respirophasic LV/RV pressure changes. Endomyocardial biopsy may be necessary to identify etiology but the yield for patchy diseases, like sarcoid, can be low. 
  5. Patients with end-stage RCM can be difficult to manage medically, especially as they become refractory to diuretics. They poorly tolerate antihypertensive agents (due to inability to augment limited stroke volume), heart rate lowering medication (due to low SV, they are dependent on HR to maintain CO which is HR x SV), and have a very limited optimal preload window (need high filling pressures to fill the stiff ventricles but also have symptoms of fluid overload). Due to anatomic considerations, patients are rarely candidates for durable left ventricular assist devices and often require orthotopic heart transplant. However, patients with RCM have higher waitlist mortality and longer wait times, in part due to lower utilization of MCS.   

Educational Video

Produced by Dr. Karan Desai

References


CardioNerds Case Reports: Recruitment Edition Series Production Team

37. Palliative Care in Heart Failure with Dr. Rab Razzak

Episode #37. Palliative Care in Heart Failure

The role of palliative care in the management of heart failure is discussed by palliative care expert, Dr. Rab Razzak, clinical associate professor and clinical director of palliative care at University Hospital Cleveland Medical Center. CardioNerds host Amit Goyal is joined by special guest interviewer, Dr. Arsalan Derakhshan, Assistant Program director at Case Western Internal Medicine residency program and the head of the Global Health Pathway as well as co-host of the Clinical Problem Solvers podcast!

Take me to the Heart Failure Topic Page
Take me to episode topics page

Dr. Rab Razzak went to medical school at Bangledesh Medical College and internal medicine residency at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Patterson, NJ. He worked initially as a hospitalist at Cedars Sinai and was grandfathered into palliative care.  He moved to Maryland to work at Johns Hopkins, where he practiced for 4.5 years. He is now a clinical associate professor and clinical director of palliative care at University Hospital Cleveland Medical Center. He is also a devoted husband, dedicated father, and a stand-up comedian! We could think of no one better to discuss Palliative Care in Heart Failure than Dr. Razzak.

Dr. Arsalan Derakhshan was born in Iran and moved to Atlanta, Georgia as a young child. He loves to travel and considers himself a global citizen. After graduating from Emory University, he attended the Medical College of Georgia and completed internal medicine residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He spends his time attending on inpatient team, staffing resident clinic, and working as the global health track director. He enjoys working with medical students and interns to help them discover their passions. His primary interests include clinical reasoning, global health,  and medical innovations. He co-hosts one of the most popular medicine podcast, The Clinical Problem Solvers and has been incredibly instrumental in the launch of The CardioNerds!

35. Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction with Dr. Kavita Sharma

Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction with Dr. Kavita Sharma

We discuss Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) with Dr. Kavita Sharma, director of the Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction Program and interim director of Advanced Heart Failure Transplant section at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. CardioNerds hosts Carine Hamo and Daniel Ambinder are joined by Dr. Beth Feldman (resident at The Johns Hopkins Hospital). Topics discussed include a definitions, diagnosis, phenotypic presentations, inpatient management of acute decompensated heart failure, role of dopamine, advanced therapies of HFpEF, and the Paraglide trial.

References mentioned in this episode can be found here

On the CardioNerds Heart Failure topic page you’ll podcast episodes, references, guest experts and contributors, and so much more.

Take me to the Heart Failure Topic Page
Take me to episode topics page

Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Primer – Youtube

Dr. Kavita Sharma graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and completed her residency and served as the assistant chief of service, cardiology fellowship and advanced heart failure fellowship at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is the Director of the Johns Hopkins Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction Program and is currently the interim director of Advanced Heart Failure Transplant section at Hopkins. She has a specialized interest in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and directs one of the largest programs in the country dedicated to caring for patients with this condition. She is the principal investigator of numerous clinical and translational trials in HFpEF and leads a team of nurses, research coordinators, and fellows-in-training in this multifaceted program. She is an invited speaker at national meetings in topic areas covering advanced heart failure and HFpEF.

Dr. Beth Feldman graduated from Temple University School of Medicine and is currently on the Longcope Firm on the Osler Medical Service at Johns Hopkins University Hospital. Before pursuing a career in medicine, she worked in health care consulting focusing in health systems. She is passionate about health policy and health systems research. She is hoping to pursue a career in cardiology, with a particular interest in critical care.

31. Fulminant Myocarditis with Cardiogenic Shock: Case Discussion

The CardioNerds discuss a case of fulminant myocarditis, teaching a comprehensive approach to myocarditis with just 5 foundational principles. Review the myocarditis infographic on the myocarditis topic page. The episode ends with a special message from the true heroes of this episode, Chas and Julie Miller. 

This marks our first episode after 100,000 downloads of the show – and this is a benchmark that we are celebrating together with all of you. Since launch, we have had 82 voices on the show and youtube channel. Our website which collates all the podcast episodes, youtube videos, tweetorials, and more has been accessed in 120 countries. We just cannot thank you enough! 

On the CardioNerds Myocarditis page you will find podcast episodes, infographic, youtube videos, references, tweetorials and guest experts & contributors, flutter stars and so much more.

5 points of maximal impulse in approaching myocarditis

  1. Build the clinical suspicion for myocarditis: You need a high index of suspicion given the variable presentation, and definitely need to keep a differential so you don’t miss things like acute coronary syndromes.
  2. Decide if EMBx is necessary: Most often obtained in fulminant presentations to look for pathologic findings of giant cell myocarditis or eosinophilic myocarditis, because these findings will change management.
  3. Manage the acute cardiac injury, which can range from supportive care to treatment of shock, arrhythmias, and even tamponade.
  4. Manage the chronic cardiac sequelae: Recovering from the acute phase of myocarditis doesn’t necessarily mean smooth sailing — some develop chronic heart failure, warranting GDMT — or guideline directed management and therapy, as defined by Dr. Randall Starling in Ep 13.
  5. Treat the myocarditis: Immunosuppression is often started empirically in fulminant disease, but continuation depends on what you find on pathology.

30. Myocarditis with Drs. JoAnn Lindenfeld, Javid Moslehi and Dr. Enrico Ammirati: Part 2


Cardiovascular experts, Drs. JoAnn Lindenfeld, Javid Moslehi and Richa Gupta from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Dr. Enrico Ammirati from Milan, Italy join Amit and Dan for a two part discussion about all things to consider for myocarditis in general (part 1) and COVID-19 myocarditis and heart transplantation in the COVID-19 era (part 2). Flutter Moment by Barrie Stanton (RN).

On the CardioNerds Myocarditis page you will find podcast episodes, infographic, youtube videos, references, tweetorials and guest experts & contributors, flutter stars and so much more.

Take me to the Myocarditis Series Page 
Take me to the COVID-19 Series Page
Take me to the Episode Topics Page

Dr. JoAnn Lindenfeld, is a Professor of Medicine and the Director of Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation Section at Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute.  She is the past president of the Heart Failure Society of America and serves on editorial boards of numerous journals including JACC, JACC Heart Failure and JHLT.  She is also a member of the AHA/ACC/HFSA heart failure guideline writing committee and was previously chair of the HFSA practice guidelines for the 2006 and 2010 guidelines. In addition to this she’s been an investigator in multiple large-scale clinical trials including the COAPT trial and has served on numerous steering committees, end point committees and data and safety monitoring committees. She is the author of a more than 300 original papers, reviews, and book chapters in the field of heart failure and heart transplantation.

Dr. Javid Moslehi is an associate professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center where he is the director of the cardio-oncology program.  He is a clinical cardiologist and basic/translational biologist interested in cardiovascular complications associated with novel molecular targeted cancer therapies and the implications of these on our knowledge of basic cardiovascular biology. At Vanderbilt he runs an independent basic and translational research laboratory and program with a focus on signal transduction in the myocardium and vasculature as well as establishing pre-clinical models of cardiotoxicity involving novel targeted oncologic therapies.

Dr. Enrico Ammirati is an assistant professor of cardiology and advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist in Milan, Italy at the Niguarda Hospital with a special research interest and expertise in acute myocarditis and acute heart failure.  He is a fellow of the European Society of Cardiology and has won numerous awards, he has also published incredibly important work on the distinction between fulminant and nonfulminant myocarditis and the prognostic implication of histologic subtypes.  His research interests also include the role of adaptive immunity in heart transplantation and atherosclerosis and he is the author of well over 100+ peer reviewed publications.

27. COVID-19: ID Part 4: Virology and epidemiology with Drs. Chida and Nematollahi

Infectious disease experts from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Drs. Natasha Chida and Saman Nematollahi join the CardioNerds for a 4 part COVID-19 infectious disease series. In this final episode, we discuss the virology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 that serves as the underpinnings for the three prior episodes. Flutter Moment by Dr. Sumeet Bahl (Vascular and Interventional Radiology)

We are honored to promote the incredible efforts of #GetUsPPE, a nonprofit organization working hard to make sure every healthcare worker is protected. Dr. Seth Trueger, emergency medicine physician and digital media editor @JAMA Network Open shares an earnest request.

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we shifted gears to meet the educational need as we all are learning more about the cardiovascular implications of SARS-CoV-2. On the CardioNerds COVID-19 series page, you will find our collection of podcast episodes, infographic, youtube videos, curated #Tweetorials, references, guest experts & contributors, flutter stars and so much more.

Check out the COVID-19 series page!
Take me to episode topics page
Click here for Youtube COVID-19 Playlist
Click here for our Youtube CV fundamentals playlist

Dr. Natasha Chida, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins. Dr Chida received her MD from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where she also earned an MSPH (masters of science in public health). She completed internal medicine residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital and infectious disease fellowship at Johns Hopkins, where we were lucky to keep her on as faculty. She is a truly incredible educator and mentor to all levels of trainees — she serves as assistant director of the infectious disease fellowship program, co-director of the medical education pathway for residents, director of education for the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health Education, and course director for the ‘Topics in Interdisciplinary Medicine’ course for medical students.

Dr. Saman Nematollahi grew up in Tucson, Arizona. He completed his undergrad at the University of Arizona with dual degrees in Physiology and Spanish Literature. He spent some time after undergrad working in a neuroscience lab before starting med school at the University of Arizona. He then moved to NYC where he completed residency at Columbia. His clinical interests include management of immunocompromised hosts, and his research interest is in medical education.  More than that he is a teacher at heart and is obtaining a Master’s of Education at the Johns Hopkins School of Education and was recently awarded a grant to develop a fungal diagnostic curriculum for residents. He loves to play soccer with his wife and son. He is master educator, appeared on and has authored many important tweetorials. He has also appeared on the hit medical podcast, The Clinical Problem Solvers.

25. COVID-19: ID Part 2: Protecting Healthcare Workers with Drs. Chida and Nematollahi

Infectious disease experts from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Drs. Natasha Chida and Saman Nematollahi join the CardioNerds for a 4 part COVID-19 infectious disease series. In this second episode, we discuss all things to consider with regards to protecting healthcare workers in COVID-19 as well as their families as they face the pandemic. Be sure to stay tuned for the remaining 2 parts of this mini-series where we will discuss the clinical presentation and diagnosis of COVID-19, and the virology. Flutter Moment by Dr. Meredith Sloan (Internal medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center).

Check out the COVID-19 series page!
Take me to episode topics page
Click here for Youtube COVID-19 Playlist

Dr. Natasha Chida, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins. Dr Chida received her MD from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where she also earned an MSPH (masters of science in public health). She completed internal medicine residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital and infectious disease fellowship at Johns Hopkins, where we were lucky to keep her on as faculty. She is a truly incredible educator and mentor to all levels of trainees — she serves as assistant director of the infectious disease fellowship program, co-director of the medical education pathway for residents, director of education for the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health Education, and course director for the ‘Topics in Interdisciplinary Medicine’ course for medical students.

Dr. Saman Nematollahi grew up in Tucson, Arizona. He completed his undergrad at the University of Arizona with dual degrees in Physiology and Spanish Literature. He spent some time after undergrad working in a neuroscience lab before starting med school at the University of Arizona. He then moved to NYC where he completed residency at Columbia. His clinical interests include management of immunocompromised hosts, and his research interest is in medical education.  More than that he is a teacher at heart and is obtaining a Master’s of Education at the Johns Hopkins School of Education and was recently awarded a grant to develop a fungal diagnostic curriculum for residents. He loves to play soccer with his wife and son. He is master educator, appeared on and has authored many important tweetorials. He has also appeared on the hit medical podcast, The Clinical Problem Solvers. 

Besides for discussing Protecting Healthcare Workers in COVID-19, we are thrilled to have Dr. Meridith Sloan on the Cardionerds podcast for her inspiring flutter moment!

Dr. Meredith Sloan is a proud graduate of the University of Virginia (Wahoowa!) and went to the Medical University of South Carolina. She is currently a third year Internal Medicine resident at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, and is looking forward to being a Chief Resident next year.

24. COVID-19: ID Part 1: Emerging treatments with Drs. Chida and Nematollahi

Infectious disease experts from the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Drs. Natasha Chida and Saman Nematollahi join the CardioNerds for a 4 part COVID-19 infectious disease series. In this first part we discuss the emerging therapies in our armamentarium. Be sure to stay tuned for the remaining 3 parts in which we tackle advice for the health care worker, the clinical presentation & diagnosis, and the virology. Flutter Moment by Dr. Justin Berk (Medicine/Pediatrics).

Check out the COVID-19 series page!
Take me to episode topics page

Dr. Natasha Chida, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins. Dr Chida received her MD from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where she also earned an MSPH (masters of science in public health). She completed internal medicine residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital and infectious disease fellowship at Johns Hopkins, where we were lucky to keep her on as faculty. She is a truly incredible educator and mentor to all levels of trainees — she serves as assistant director of the infectious disease fellowship program, co-director of the medical education pathway for residents, director of education for the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health Education, and course director for the ‘Topics in Interdisciplinary Medicine’ course for medical students.

Dr. Saman Nematollahi grew up in Tucson, Arizona. He completed his undergrad at the University of Arizona with dual degrees in Physiology and Spanish Literature. He spent some time after undergrad working in a neuroscience lab before starting med school at the University of Arizona. He then moved to NYC where he completed residency at Columbia. His clinical interests include management of immunocompromised hosts, and his research interest is in medical education.  More than that he is a teacher at heart and is obtaining a Master’s of Education at the Johns Hopkins School of Education and was recently awarded a grant to develop a fungal diagnostic curriculum for residents. He loves to play soccer with his wife and son. He is master educator, appeared on and has authored many important tweetorials. He has also appeared on the hit medical podcast, The Clinical Problem Solvers. 

22. COVID-19: The Iranian Experience with Dr. Reza Hashemian

We share with you the Iranian experience with COVID-19, a rare first hand report from ICU doctor, Dr. Reza Hashemian, covering the clinical, the societal, and the personal. Flutter Moment by Edward Nejat (Reproductive Endocrinology).

Check out the COVID-19 series page!
Take me to episode topics page
Ventilation primer for the cardiologist (Youtube)

Dr. Reza Hashemian serves as Professor of Critical care medicine at a large academic hospital in the heart of Iran. He in on the frontlines at Masih Daneshvari hospital in Tehran, the country’s top pulmonary public hospital and the main facility overseeing coronavirus patients.